ProShot: Small Project Sprayer Selection

Quick tutorial by Scott Burt on sprayer selection for small shop or on site projects, with emphasis on the differences between the Graco ProShot and the ProShot Fine Finish Unit. Footage shows a batch of kitchen cabinet doors and shelving being primed with unthinned acrylic primer through the ProShot. Feedback and questions are welcome, as always.

Scott Burt

Scott Burt is a contractor and freelance writer whose column "From the Field" has appeared in American Painting Contractor magazine (www.paintmag.com) since 2008. His writing and projects also appear in other print and digital venues. This site is an extension of Scott's publication work, and he encourages readers to leave comments and questions about articles published here. Hope to hear from you!

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Sites That Link to this Post

  1. ProShot Small Project Sequel | topcoatreview | June 14, 2011
  2. Graco ProShot, on Further Review | June 12, 2011
  1. Mike says:

    oh by the way don’t try to spray a ceiling with it it will not work or anything below your knees I was trying to spray a ceiling and I heard a strange noise that noise cost me $500 the paint store tells me it is trash do not waste your money I am very disappointed

  2. Mike says:

    this thing is the biggest piece of crap ever made I didn’t even get 15 gallons through mine and that paint store tells me it is no good anymore not to mention they have at least three or four of them garbage

    • Scott Burt says:

      Wow, sorry to hear that Mike. They do seem to be a bit like snowflakes, every one is a little different, especially when you factor in what materials get run through them etc. One thing I think Graco could have done a better job on in the past is educating contractors about how to maintain them. I think alot of guys had bad luck with them because they didn’t know how to break them down and maintain some of the critical internal components. (not saying this was the case with you). It is a bummer when they don’t hold up because no one wants a pricy disposable tool that gets disposed of that quickly!

  3. leo perez says:

    HI scott, my name is Leo can you help me with this please. Can i use the original proshot and the proshot fine finish for acrylic paint and enamel paint, im doing manly new doors and the doors the top coat is goint to be full gloss acrylic, can i use the proshot fine finish for puting acrylic primer??

    regards Leo perez

  4. Brian Finnegan says:

    Scott

    Thanks for the Review. I have used to Pro Shot many times, and it does exactly what it says on the tin. I used it for door repaints, where we repainted approx 40 doors that we stood up using the brackets that you can get from any hardware store. I have heard the following complaints from other tradesmen that I must acknowledge and quickly dismiss:

    1. “if you tilt it it stops spraying” ITS NOT MEANT TO BE OVERLY TILTED AND THERE IS A BACK PACK AND HOSE AVAILABLE NOW

    2. “it doesnt hold enough product” THE VIDEO REVIEW HERE HAS SHOWN IT TO SPRAY ALMOST A DOZEN CABINET DOORS AND FIXTURES IN 2 MINUTES AS OPPOSED TO 30 MINUTES BY HAND ITS NOT AN ALL ROUND TOOL IT HAS A SPECIFIC PURPOSE AND PARAMETERS.

    we could go on, but I have found it to be an excellent aid and resource! especially when circumstances change on a job, or how about when you have packed up your airless on an exterior paint job and you realize there is a part you forgot to do? or a customer wants another part sprayed, out with the proshot and get it done in minutes rather than spending an extra hour or two

    Cheers Scott

    Be Blessed

    Brian Finnegan
    Painter and Decorator

  5. One more thing, do you have to oil these sprayers? Is there any maintenance other just cleaning after use?

  6. Scott, thanks for the video. I remember when these sprayers were first coming out, one drawback was the non-replaceable parts, they were suppose to push out X amount of gallons and then you had no options for repacking. Is this still true? Or have done something about that?

    • The ProShot and ProShot Fine Finish can be repacked at 50 gallons, and then they are good for another 50, for a life expectancy of 100 gallons. I believe Graco attached these ratings just so that we would have some idea of what to expect, but its an impossible prediction to make, other than on a bench, because everyone will use the tool differently, in terms of what products they run through it, cleaning habits, frequency of use, etc. Some people will get more than the avg expectancy, some will get less. At the price of these things, I dont expect them to last forever, but I do want the tool to pay for itself and then be profitable. It hits that mark, at least so far in our experience with the units.

  7. Dan Frost says:

    Scott: Nice review; you did a great job holding the camera and spraying; I thought someone else was assisting you. My only comment would be about of overspray (“cloud”) created by the airless. I can see using the Proshot for priming (because you have to sand in between coats) but without a spray booth getting a smooth finish with the Proshot is problematic, no? I would be interested in your thougths.

    • Thanks, Dan. Yes, it was kind of tricky holding the camera (iphone) and spraying. You raise a good point, its worth noting that in this video I am actually using a 515 tip, which is huge. Generally, it would be smaller, reducing overspray. I have done finish coats with the ProShot and if everything in the batch is wet at the same time, you tend to putting enough on that its staying wet long enough to not result in much of an issue. BUT, we still go to a different rig for the finish coats, even in a small batch like this, just to remove the possibility. If it was not kitchen stuff, and was for instance closet shelving or outdoor rail parts or something, I’d run with the PS. Have you tried the Fine FInish? At 1500 adjustable psi, 2 motor speeds and smaller tip selection there is MUCH less overspray.

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