Typical ProShot Spraying Task


Here’s a quick example of a typical task in the shop that lends itself well to using the Graco ProShot cordless sprayer. Note: this is the regular ProShot, not the Fine Finish unit, and we ARE using it (again) on cabinet grade parts and pieces. As you can see in the video, its not a large quantity of parts and pieces, but they are cabinet pieces and do require a good finish. In the video, Todd sprays acrylic primer through the ProShot. He is free to lay out parts and pieces and shoot from any angle he wants, which is one misconception about the ProShot that I have heard in the past. To be clear, it can spray at most any angle, provided there is enough material in the cup to accomodate the suction tube orientation within the cup. Also, the spray tech in this situation really appreciates the ability to move around and spray anything from any angle, without having to tend a hose. At the end of the task, he also doesn’t have to flush a hose. Todd’s only regret was that the two wonky shaped doors got sprayed face first. These parts sat on the racks for a few hours and then were flipped to spray the other sides. They will then be lightly sanded and finish coated using either the ProShot or the 395 air assisted, depending on the shop workload next week.

Scott Burt

Scott Burt is a contractor and freelance writer whose column "From the Field" has appeared in American Painting Contractor magazine (www.paintmag.com) since 2008. His writing and projects also appear in other print and digital venues. This site is an extension of Scott's publication work, and he encourages readers to leave comments and questions about articles published here. Hope to hear from you!

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2 Reader Comments

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  1. familyprofessionalpainting Dale Thomas says:

    Like the fact that you use video to show the Proshots capabilities, rather than relying on text alone. It’s an added dimension.

  2. We do try to use video as much as possible to make it more real and help viewers get the sensory experience of the products we are working with. If I start doing videos of us watching paint dry, I trust that you all will tell me it is boring.

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